Why christianity important?

The Christian faith focuses on beliefs about the birth, life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Although it began with a small group of followers, many historians consider the spread and adoption of Christianity around the world to be one of the most successful spiritual missions in human history.

Why christianity important?

The Christian faith focuses on beliefs about the birth, life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Although it began with a small group of followers, many historians consider the spread and adoption of Christianity around the world to be one of the most successful spiritual missions in human history. Christianity is a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth. It is the largest religion in the world, with about 2.8 billion followers, representing a third of the world's population.

It is estimated that his followers, known as Christians, constitute the majority of the population in 157 countries and territories, and believe that Jesus is the Son of God, whose coming as messiah was prophesied in the Hebrew Bible (called the Old Testament in Christianity) and narrated in the New Testament. The Creator God is no different from the God who provides redemption in Jesus Christ through his Holy Spirit. God is the source of all things. This means that God created the world out of nothing through a deliberate act of his free will.

A Christian worldview affirms that God is the sovereign and all-powerful Lord of all existence. This statement rejects any form of dualism, that matter has existed eternally or that, therefore, it must be bad, since in principle it opposes God, the Source of all good. However, among people who do identify with a religion, there have been few, if any, changes in many measures of religious belief. People who are affiliated with a religious tradition are just as likely, now as in the recent past, to say that religion is very important in their lives and to believe in heaven.

They are also equally likely to believe in God, although the proportion of adults affiliated with the religion who believe in God with absolute certainty has declined slightly. When seeking guidance on issues of good and evil, a plurality of Americans say they rely primarily on their common sense and personal experiences. However, there has been a notable increase in the proportion of adults affiliated with the religion who say they come to its religious teachings for guidance. Adults say that religion is at least “something important in their lives,” and more than half (53%) say it's “very important.”.

Roughly one in five say that religion “isn't too important” (11%) or “it's not at all important in their lives” (11%). For Americans who are affiliated with religion, the importance that people attach to religion varies slightly depending on religious tradition. Approximately eight out of ten or more Jehovah's Witnesses (90%), members of historically black Protestant churches (85%), Mormons (84%) and evangelical Protestants (79%) say that religion is very important in their lives. These numbers have remained almost the same in recent years.

There is considerable variation in the way in which members of different religious groups conceive of God. For example, seven out of ten Christians think of God as a person with whom people can have a relationship. Only about a quarter of people who belong to non-Christian religions (26%) share this view. Among non-Christian religions, it is more common to see God as an impersonal force.

Among people not affiliated with religion, approximately three out of ten (31%) say that God is an impersonal force, a quarter say that God is better to see him as a person, and a third say that God does not exist. However, among the subgroup of religious “no” who describe their religion as “nothing in particular” and who also say that religion is very or something important in their lives, a small majority (53%) say they believe in a personal God. Roughly seven out of ten Americans (72%) believe in “a heaven where people who have led a good life are eternally rewarded”. Belief in heaven is almost universal among Mormons (95%) and members of the historically black Protestant tradition (93%).

Belief in heaven is also widespread among evangelical Protestants (88%), Catholics (85%), Orthodox Christians (81%) and mainstream Protestants (80%). The only groups in which far less than half say they believe in heaven are Jews (40%) and unaffiliated groups (37%). While relatively few atheists or agnostics believe in heaven, a large proportion of those whose religion is “nothing” in particular and who also say that religion is at least something important in their lives believe in heaven (72%). Belief in hell is more common among members of historically black Protestant churches (82%) and evangelical Protestant churches (82%).

Slightly fewer Catholics (63%), Mormons (62%), majority Protestants (60%) and Orthodox Christians (59%) say they believe in hell. Three-quarters of Christians believe that the Bible is the word of God, including approximately nine out of ten evangelicals (88%), Mormons (91%) and Jehovah's Witnesses (94%). Among members of other Christian traditions, smaller majorities say that the Bible is the Word of God. While there is general agreement among Christian groups on this issue, there is disagreement as to whether the Bible can be taken “literally, word for word.”.

The majority of evangelical Protestants (55%) and members of historically black Protestant churches (59%) believe that the Bible should be taken literally, but fewer Christians from other traditions defend a literalist view of the Bible. There has been little change in recent years in the proportion of Christians who believe that the Bible should be interpreted literally, word for word. Respondents who are affiliated with a religion were asked to choose one of the three statements that best reflected their point of view on how their religion should relate to modernity. A plurality of Americans affiliated with religion (46%) believe that their religion should “preserve traditional beliefs and practices”.

A third (34%) say that their congregation or denomination should “adjust traditional beliefs and practices in the light of new circumstances.”. Only 14% of people who are affiliated with a religious tradition say that their religion should “adopt modern beliefs and practices.”. The majority of Mormons (70%), Jehovah's Witnesses (60%), evangelical Protestants (61%) and members of historically black Protestant churches (53%), as well as half of Orthodox Christians (50%) hold the belief that their religion must preserve traditional practices. Muslims are very divided as to whether their religion should preserve traditional beliefs and practices or adjust traditional beliefs and practices in the light of new circumstances.

Among other religious groups, including Jews, mainstream Protestants and Catholics, the most common view is that religions should adjust traditional practices. This view is held by the vast majority of leading Protestants (80%) and Catholics (79%), as well as a smaller majority of Orthodox Christians (68%) and members of historically black Protestant churches (57%) and approximately half of evangelicals (52%). Less than half of Mormons (40%) and only one in ten Jehovah's Witnesses (8%) believe that many religions can lead to eternal life. Among the non-Christian religious traditions that are broad enough to analyze, most say that many religions can lead to eternal life.

Most Christians who say that many religions can lead to eternal life also say that non-Christian religions can lead to heaven. In fact, half of Christians say that some non-Christian religions can lead to eternal life, while approximately four out of ten say that theirs is the only true faith that leads to eternal life or that only Christianity can result in eternal life. Approximately one in ten Christians does not express any opinion or offer other points of view on these issues. Two-thirds of Catholics (68%) and major Protestants (65%) say that some non-Christian religions can lead to eternal life, as do 59% of Orthodox Christians.

This view is less common among other Christian groups. Approximately four out of ten members of historically black Protestant denominations (38%) say that some non-Christian religions can lead to eternal life, as do three out of ten evangelical and Mormon Protestants (31% each). Very few Jehovah's Witnesses (5%) believe this. When looking for answers to questions about right and wrong, more Americans say they turn to practical experience and common sense (45%) than to any other source of guidance.

The next most common source of guidance is religious beliefs and teachings (33%), while far fewer rely on philosophy and reason (11%) or scientific information (9%). While Christians in general are more likely than members of other religious groups to say that there are absolute standards for good and evil, there are big differences within Christianity. Nearly six out of ten Mormons (57%) and Jehovah's Witnesses (57%) say there are clear rules for good and evil. Evangelical Protestants are divided in their opinions: 50% say there are absolute standards and 48% say it depends on the situation.

Fewer Orthodox Christians (33%), majority Protestants (32%), Catholics (30%) and members of the historically black Protestant tradition (29%) say that there are clear and absolute rules on good and evil. Among members of non-Christian religions, about three-quarters say that determining right from wrong is usually situational. Similarly, more than eight out of ten atheists and agnostics express this view, as do three-quarters of those whose religion is “nothing in particular”. About the Pew Research Center The Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan data center that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends that shape the world.

Conducts public opinion surveys, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical research in social sciences. The Pew Research Center does not adopt political positions. It is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts. I think that Dockery's essay, as well as other similar essays, are very useful for members of the “Church of Christ”, that is, to provide information and suggestions for action to members of the Christian community.

Secondly, in Jesus, Christians believe that they have the clearest expression of the central nature of God and of how God wants to be in relationship with humanity and the world. Christians believe that God's fundamental character toward creation is love, and that everything God does in the world is intended to manifest that love. The Old Testament contains the revelation of God to man through the prophets and the promises and prophecies about the coming of Christ, while the New Testament contains the teachings of Christ and the spread of early Christianity and the prophecies about the end times, also called eschaton in Greek. Unfortunately, the “Enlightenment” and, in particular, Darwin's THEORY of evolution have taken hold of the minds of many today who believe that they are enlightened and, therefore, can do without Christianity.

The gradual division of Gentile Christianity caused Jewish Christians to continue to follow the Law of Moses, including practices such as circumcision. Other Christian religions, such as Unitarian Universalism, Jehovah's Witnesses, and Mormonism, do not share these views on the Trinity. Christianity believes that Christ is the Messiah, God and Man at the same time, and that through his death man has been freed from the captivity of the devil. Other important Christian symbols include the chi-rho monogram, the dove and the olive branch (which symbolize the Holy Spirit), the sacrificed lamb (which represents the sacrifice of Christ), the vine (which symbolizes the Christian's connection with Christ) and many others.

Many people assume that this is a modern idea, born out of a commitment to a more liberal and secular society, but this doctrine actually has a long history in the Christian tradition. Christians believe first and foremost that Jesus Christ is the word of God made flesh, through which all things were created (cf. Christianity has not generally practiced aniconism, nor has it avoided or prohibited devotional images, although the first Jewish Christians and some modern denominations, invoking the prohibition of idolatry in the Decalogue, avoided the figures in their symbols. But what is it that makes this life so rewarding? What is it that makes the Christian life the best life there is? Here are eleven incredible benefits of being a Christian.

One of the most pressing aspects of a Christian understanding of salvation is how it relates to the way Christians view other religious traditions. . .